Music

Emma Forman - The Good Times

Emma Forman’s May release, The Good Times, exhibits a musical talent that draws influence from multiple genres to delve into themes of forgiveness, love, and regret.

Forman, who hails from Peterhead, takes the listener on a journey. The acoustic, relatively tranquil, eponymous track that opens the album is reflective, pensive, nostalgic. The mood intensifies throughout, replacing acoustic with electric guitar, the piano with heavier drum beats, and the lyrics begin to reflect more on personal change and overcoming hardship by rebuilding expectations. Dark and fuzzy, Pixies inspired, the swansong of ‘Ripple Effect’ rounds off the album with a  lingering question: were the good times in the past, or are they yet to come? 

Emma Forman’s May release, The Good Times, exhibits a musical talent that draws influence from multiple genres to delve into themes of forgiveness, love, and regret.

Forman, who hails from Peterhead, takes the listener on a journey. The acoustic, relatively tranquil, eponymous track that opens the album is reflective, pensive, nostalgic. The mood intensifies throughout, replacing acoustic with electric guitar, the piano with heavier drum beats, and the lyrics begin to reflect more on personal change and overcoming hardship by rebuilding expectations. Dark and fuzzy, Pixies inspired, the swansong of ‘Ripple Effect’ rounds off the album with a  lingering question: were the good times in the past, or are they yet to come? 

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Ruaraidh Wishart

Ruaraidh Wishart, who performs under the name Little League Rebellion, is a musician who has a passion for local voices and stories. An experienced musician who draws upon his time spent performing  a wide range of different genres – Ruaraidh has set out to adapt the underrated works of Charles Murray, Alford’s most famous poet. He says;

“I first encountered the poetry of Charles Murray in 2014 whilst working on a heritage education project about NE Scotland’s experience of the First World War – “Hard Vrocht Grun”. I was struck by how powerfully he projected the voices and views of the farming people in the region at that time, making them live again. Some of the views are surprising, others have a timeless and universal quality.

I also felt that this poetry isn’t known well enough – perhaps because of a perception that the language is too difficult, or that it’s too “couthy”. But I felt they could be understood well enough, both linguistically and aesthetically, if they were delivered in the right way.”

Ruaraidh is hoping to complete his project of adapting 5 more poems from Murray’s “A Sough O’ War” into an EP by the summer. 

Charlie Abel is a local Accordion player, mostly widely known for his tenureship over the Blue Lamp traditional music session every Monday and as the front man of Aberdonian ceilidh band Iron Broo. Here you can listen to his track, Dr. Fitz Wendland from his album A Celtic Voice. His Youtube channel also features a wider array of his original material as well as many of his performances of traditional tunes as well, showing off his penchant for writing tunes and songs as well as his playing virtuosity. 

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Matt Gibb is a locally based Electronic musician, student and founding member of the Re-Analogue arts collective. His most recent EP, ‘Lips Destroy Sun’, is comprised of four tracks of dreamy ambient electronica which blend together DIY synths and drumbeats with vocal samples. One can certainly pick out the influences from lo-fi hip-hop and a fascination with the bright tones and airy rhythms from early vaporwave or even Steve Reich. The end result is a bittersweet nugget of daydreaming wistfulness, a beautiful ornament to these bright but chilly days. 

Bea Dawkins is an experimental sonic artist, based here in the city. She studied up to PhD level at the University of Aberdeen where she became interested in the possibilities of the creative sonification of place. In her own words: “the piece [Sounds of The Silent City] suggests a journey to Aberdeen where we are bombarded with the hussle and bussle of the city centre before escaping to the beach…There are sections of stress and intensity and moments of calm and almost unsettling stillness.”